Meetups in February


(alan) #21

I’m still game – we just need to find a volunteer :slight_smile:


(ted prendergat) #22

Let me know a time and place and I will be there with 2 others.


(John Mason) #23

Hi all!

I spoke with Emma from TEK Systems and their office in uptown has 5-6 “interview rooms” that will actually be perfect for this. TEK Systems is happy to host us and offer food + drink. They’re space is available on these days:

March 13, Tues 6:30-8:30
March 15, Thurs 6:30-8:30
March 27, Tues 6:30-8:30

Are any of those dates preferrable to anyone? Otherwise, perhaps we should just go with the 27th to have time to get the word out.

@teddyp18 and @joshuamil if you can confirm that you and/or additional interviewers can make it, what you would think if we market this event as sponsored by Red Ventures, Skookum and TEK Systems?


(alan) #24

But would these interviews be one on one? Or open to everybody? My original thought was to be open to everybody so that one person can get actionable feedback and others can watch and learn too.


(John Mason) #25

Yeah I agree. I was thinking of splitting off into small(ish) groups instead of the whole crowd watching one person at a time. Open to ideas though!


(alan) #26

Ah! I see what you mean… that’s an interesting concept!


(Josh) #27

The one issue I see here is a lot of people get stage fright in front of a lot of others. To make matters worse, we’d be putting them in a deliberately challenging situation where they are sort of set up to flounder a bit. Maybe we could record it or something, but I’d hate to see people miss out on getting the help they want because they’re too nervous to get in front of a group. Any thoughts on that?

Overall, I think it’s a great idea, though.


(John Mason) #28

@josh_lawson the current plan is to break out into smaller groups so the “stage” isn’t so big. Speaking of recording, that would be amazing. Any ideas on how we can make things less intimidating?


(Josh) #29

I’ve found that some people get nervous no matter the crowd size. It’s not about the size, it’s just a general fear of public speaking. If we’re going to do small groups anyway, maybe one way we could work with those folks is by offering to make one of those groups private. Maybe we could still discuss some of the things the interviewee did right and what they could improve on publicly, or document it somehow, but do the actual mock interview privately. Just a thought. Of course, it might be worrying about a problem that doesn’t exist. Perhaps we could set up a small poll to see if that would be helpful to people?

Regarding recording, I don’t know how technical we can or need to get, but some simple audio equipment would probably suffice. I have a USB mic that I use for simple stuff directly into my Mac. It would be nice to have a mixer to USB so that the levels are already good when we send them to GarageBand. It would be nice to have at least two mics if we were going to try to record audio. Possibly a third for the MC. If we had a mixer or preamp to usb, we could route it all into that and just go to one source. That might be cool, if we can make it happen.


(Justin Holt) #30

Josh, I have a wired lavilier mic as well as a shotgun mic and hand held if you need to use them. I have been recording some of the meetups we host at Wray Ward and my setup is geared towards recording on an iPhone but should work fine what you need. Send me a message if you want to use them for this event.


(Josh) #31

That’s awesome! That could be really useful. What is your setup for recording to an iPhone? Are you typically using the lavalier for the speaker and then a shotgun for ambient sound or audience? I’d love to get your insight, since most of my experience with recording is just for music.

I guess we would have to decide what our setup is going to be, if we can get the gear we need, and if we can get somebody to handle it. I could do it in a pinch if we could get our hands on the gear, but there is probably somebody who is better than me at that stuff.

In my mind, for everybody we were trying to record, we would need some means of recording. Something like a Zoom H4 would probably work. Put it in the center of the table and let it do its thing. Or we would need a setup like this:

  • 1 mic, at least. Ideally two.
  • a stand for each mic, either floor or table, if we don’t have laviliers
  • cables for each mic
  • a mixer with a usb output
  • a computer to record on
  • headphones to monitor

This sounds like it could be a little complicated. I have some of the gear, not all, but I’m worried about the setup more than anything. Does anybody else have thoughts? I know @kirillian does a podcast, so he could probably speak to this as well.


(Justin Holt) #32

Yeah thats exactly the setup. I have some reverse splitter adapters that merge the inputs from the lavalier and the shotgun. I got a perfect little holder for the iphone that mounts to a tripod and has ports on top and side for accessories, which allows me to mount the Rode shotgun mic on top. The only drawback there is that the shotgun isn’t pointing directly towards the audience but I still picked up good sound on them. You can listen/view two of the recordings at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLkT9rxGAmXAcjY9LBt-gjTPgPpghNw-n8. I’ve also got two lightweight tripods of decent quality you can use if needed.


(alan) #33

The one issue I see here is a lot of people get stage fright in front of a lot of others. To make matters worse, we’d be putting them in a deliberately challenging situation where they are sort of set up to flounder a bit. Maybe we could record it or something, but I’d hate to see people miss out on getting the help they want because they’re too nervous to get in front of a group. Any thoughts on that?

My only thoughts are that if they’re too nervous in front of a group then this scenario is exactly the type of exercise they need to go through in order to overcome that challenge.

Real-life interviews are not 1:1 all the time. Sometimes there are 2 or 3 people in the same room. I once was interviewed by 5 people at the same time.

In my mind, a mock interview in front of a group is the perfect place for them to fail, get nervous and truly be themselves.


(John R Epperson) #34

I actually agree that challenging people is good. However, you also have to come to them where they are at right now otherwise they often just run away from the path. Something I did in high school that worked really well was we did practice interviews at a school with 2-4 people in a room. Each interview was recorded and everyone would rotate between rooms so that someone got to do about 4 or 5 interviews over the course of a few hours on a Saturday morning. It was pretty exhausting, but you got your videos to take with you so you could review things. I liked some of the pattern here…the idea that you could take the video with you so you could improve yourself is one piece. The other thing I really liked was that we had about 5 rooms with between 2 and 4 people, so thats about 10-20 volunteers who interviewed you and then spent like 5 minutes giving you feedback.

To the other point about doing it publicly, I wonder if we could create a single public stage area and see how many people we get that would be willing to do it publicly. My guess is that 90+% of people wont be. If this is for the benefit of the people being interviewed, I wonder if it might be best to default to private and let those that are willing to do it publicly do so.

Regarding recording equipment, I DO have some mobile recording equipment, but not for a phone…for my laptop sure, but it’s podcast equipment, so its designed for someone to sit right in front of it…we’d want those mics that they have on mobile cameras that record sound from all directions at a distance probably for this kind of thing I would think…


(Josh) #35

if they’re too nervous in front of a group then this scenario is exactly the type of exercise they need to go through in order to overcome that challenge.

I absolutely agree that this is true. However, we aren’t therapists and our job is not to work them through their shyness. We are trying to put together an event to help people. If we’re saying that we can’t cater to people who might be really shy or squeamish about getting in front of people to the exclusion of others, that’s fine. But if we want to make sure that everyone who wants to benefit from a mock interview, then I think it’s good to give these folks an opportunity as well. And while I agree that sometimes people need to step outside of their comfort zone and challenge themselves sometimes, the net result will most likely be that these people simply won’t participate, and they won’t get the benefit.

Furthermore, I know this kind of goes against what I said before, but if we WERE trying to get them comfortable with the idea of being interviewed by a group of people, putting them in front of 3-5 would be a good first step, but being interviewed by 4 people in front of 100 other people would probably even make me nervous. Putting these folks in front of a big public audience would probably just cause them to nope out completely.


Job Interview Practice Planning